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A Test Case: Discussion Post Eight (July 29) Discussion The Wall Since our last chapters are so thin, I decided to replace the chapter “A Test Case,” with a review of our own. If you haven’t read the last few pages of the book, the chapter “Is He Serious, and Other Ironies,” is an important one to read through. Do not forget that you have until August 5th to complete any and all posts!


-I want you to choose a novel that you have read recently (in the past year). Re-read the first two chapters to refresh your memory. After you have re-read the chapters, answer the questions below:

What does the ‘story’ signify?--What do you think the author is sayin...

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Heart Disease and Illness: Discussion Post Seven (July 22) Discussion The Wall Throughout Foster’s discussion of literature, one fact we can all agree on is the overwhelming idea that nothing just happens in literature. What I mean by that is, when something happens, the writer put it in the work intentionally. It may be there to give us an idea about a character, historical time period, social structure the work was written, or the writer themselves. This week’s topic is no different. In the reading this week, Foster discusses the implications of disease in literature.

After re-reading the chapters, I found it hard to pinpoint certain novels or short stories I h...

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Scars, Hunchbacks, and Broken Legs: Discussion Post Six (July 15) Discussion The Wall A character’s appearance is significant to readers and writers since it is one way an author uses to characterize a character. So, why do writer’s give certain deformities to their characters? Foster explains that “more often than not physical markings by their very nature call attention to themselves and signify some psychological or thematic point the writer wants to make” (200).

Read some of the ways Foster discusses why authors use these deformities in literature and complete the following:

Pick a character from a novel, play, or short story who has a physical deformity. It coul...

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Where Were They Again? (Geography): Discussion Post Five (July 8) Discussion The Wall I hope all of you had a wonderful week off to enjoy the fourth with your family and friends! Don't forget that all posts need to be completed by August 5 to earn credit. This week's discussion focuses on a major facet of analyzing literature: setting.

We all have heard that setting in literature is important, but Foster tells us that “[i]t isn’t just setting, that hoary old English class topic. It’s place and space and shape that bring us to ideas and psychology and history and dynamism” (Foster, 174).

-Interpret what you think Foster means by this quote in regard to literature.

-Us...

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Politics, Religion, and Flight: Discussion Post Four (June 24) Discussion The Wall You guys have been doing extremely well with your discussion posts. I love seeing the perspectives that you’ve been bringing to these specific reading topics. Since this week’s reading covered several chapters, I am going to give you a choice on which chapters you consider in your discussion. Choose only one part below to answer, making sure that you clarify which you are considering in your response.

Option One: Politics
Foster Explains he both loves and loathes “political” literature. He also states that his contemporaries suggest that all literature is inherently political.
-Choos...

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Weathering the Storm: Discussion Post Three (June 17) Discussion Summer Reading Posts Although the chapters about fairy tales and mythological allusions are interesting, I want to talk focus on the discussion about the weather. Foster states that when dealing with weather in literature: “It’s never just rain” (or snow, sleet, wind, etc.).

Please read the poem “Rain” by Claribel Alegria (below). How does the rain function in this poem? What does the rain do to the speaker? What is the overall message of this poem? How does the rain influence the tone (attitude) of the poem and how might you describe the tone (attitude) of the poem? Make sure you discuss specific quotes from...

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I've Read This Before: Discussion Post Two (June 10) Discussion Summer Reading Posts Chapter 4 discusses poetic forms – we will hit those pretty hard throughout the year, so I’m not going to spend time on them now. I do want to talk about the idea of originality (or lack thereof) in literature. Foster claims “there’s no such thing as a wholly original work of literature” (29) and that many stories can be traced back to Shakespeare and/or the Bible. Do you think one may fully experience a work of literature if one does not “get” the various allusions contained within the work? Have you ever re-read a piece of literature that maybe you had read previously (say, in middle scho...

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On The Road Again: Discussion Post One (June 3) Discussion Summer Reading Posts In chapters 1 - 3, Foster discusses the significance of travel, food, and the destruction of good by evil forces (vampire chapter). Can you think of any novels, plays, or poems that exemplify the point made in each chapter? Post your titles with explanations. Be sure to link back your discussion to each chapter's subject.

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Welcome to the Summer Reading Blog! Blog Discussion Welcome! We are so excited to have you participating in our summer reading blog over the fabulous novelHow to Read Literature Like a Professor. This discussion board will prepare you for your in depth analysis this upcoming school year in our AP Literature & Composition course. We will discuss the pertinent information you need to know in order to fully appreciate and understand literature. When we begin our discussions, make sure you do the following: 1) Create an identifiable name. Use your first initial/last name or some other identifiable construction (ex: kmorris). 2)...

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Your last example is very interesting even though it's not a novel. The protagonist, although he has to use evil to get what he wanted, ... Discussion The Wall Your last example is very interesting even though it's not a novel. The protagonist, although he has to use evil to get what he wanted, did actively try and save another's life. Do you think he falls into the 'normal' category for someone who is selfish? Why do you think the writers initially decided that he could only use evil to complete this selfish good?

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